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EVER EVER EVER Motto Divder

Baltimore Police Museum
History of Maryland Law Enforcement motto 2
Colonial Maryland

Under English common law, every person had an active responsibility for keeping the peace. This was a vital principle in colonial Maryland, a fledgling society with no police or peace officers. The responsibility included crime prevention through vigilance and the apprehension of suspected lawbreakers by groups of persons raising the "hue and cry" or the more official "posse comitatus." Persons whose previous behavior indicated that they were at risk of breaking the peace could be taken before a local court or magistrate and bound over to keep the peace, thereby, in theory, preventing crime. Adapted from the British legal system were the positions of sheriff and constable, officers of the county court who also enforced the law. Sheriffs and constables had no jurisdiction outside their own county. As population increased, county and municipal police departments were created to meet local needs.

1785 Baltimore arrest warrant 12
Arrest Warrant Dated 1785
Baltimore was formally designated a "Town" in 1729 and incorporated as a city in 1797.  After the Revolution, Baltimore Town was the County Seat for Baltimore County and remained in that position until 1854.  It was only in 1854 that Baltimore City enacted the position of Baltimore City Sheriff.  Prior to that, the sheriff was, technically and practically, the sheriff of Baltimore City and County.  So, prior to 1854, any court document from the Baltimore County sheriff would also apply to Balto. City for service or execution.

Baltimore police bullet receipt 11884 12
1884 Receipt for Ammo 3000 rounds
det receipt 1869 12
(1 of 2) Receipts from 1869 Paying two Doctors as Detectives in the Health Department
det receipt 1869 nov 12
(2 of 2) Receipts from 1869 Paying two Doctors as Detectives in the Health Department
recall72
Recall Light

Baltimore City Police Force

The first State agency to exercise police powers was the Baltimore City Police Force. Established in 1867 under a Board of Police Commissioners, the Force was elected by the General Assembly (Chapter 367, Acts of 1867). Baltimore had been developing a police force since the formation in 1784 of a night watch "very necessary to prevent fires, burglaries, and other outrages and disorders" (Chapter 69, Acts of 1784). Its police force, from 1867, was governed by a State board although jurisdiction was limited to the City. From 1900 to 1920, the Board of Police Commissioners was appointed by the Governor. After 1920, a single Police Commissioner of Baltimore City was chosen and also served on the Governor's Advisory Council. The Baltimore City Police Department remained under State governance until 1978, when the Mayor began to appoint the Police Commissioner, subject to confirmation by the City Council (Chapter 920, Acts of 1976).


State Detective Force

In 1909, the Board of Police Commissioners of Baltimore City urged the creation of a State detective force since the Governor, the Fire Marshal, and State's Attorneys in the counties frequently sought help from Baltimore City's expert investigators. The first tentative step towards a statewide police force, however, was taken in 1914 as a corps of motorcycle officers under the Commissioner of Motor Vehicles began to enforce motor vehicle laws throughout Maryland (Chapter 564, Acts of 1914).


State Police Force

When a crime wave struck Maryland after World War I, the need for statewide enforcement of criminal law became critical. The Governor, the Police Commissioner of Baltimore City, and the Commissioner of Motor Vehicles came up with a plan for a State Police Force under the Commissioner of Motor Vehicles. Former servicemen were recruited and the first training camp was conducted early in 1921. By 1922, the force of motorcycle deputies had statewide jurisdiction over criminal cases through deputization by the county sheriffs. The force was supported by a plainclothes investigative department and was known as the State Police Force.


Maryland State Police

In 1935, the Maryland State Police was established as a separate unit of State government (Chapter 303, Acts of 1935). The new agency was funded out of revenues from the Department of Commissioner of Motor Vehicles. It was granted additional statewide police powers to enforce fish, oyster, game and other conservation laws and maintain a training school. The Maryland State Police were made part of the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services in 1970.


Maryland Department of State Police

In 1994, the Department of Maryland State Police was formed as a principal executive department (Chapter 165, Acts of 1994). It was renamed the Department of State Police in 1995 (Chapter 3, Acts of 1995).
The Department of State Police enforces State motor vehicle and criminal laws and safeguards the lives and safety of all persons within the State. The Department protects property and assists all persons to secure the equal protection of law. The Department also preserves the public peace; detects and prevents crime; and enforces the laws and ordinances of the State and its local subdivisions. It apprehends and arrests criminals and lawbreakers, and preserves order in public places. In addition, the Department maintains the safe, orderly flow of traffic on public streets and highways and cooperates with and assists other law enforcement agencies.
The Department of State Police has statewide jurisdiction except in incorporated municipalities. Within municipalities the Department may exercise jurisdiction under certain conditions, as regulated by statute (Code 1957, Art. 88B, secs. 3, 4, 20, and 23). The Department also enforces the laws relating to controlled dangerous substances (narcotics) throughout the State with no jurisdictional limitations (Code 1957, Art. 27, sec. 298(g)).


State Fire Marshal

The State Fire Marshal and the State Fire Prevention Commission were transferred in 1997 from the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services to the Department of State Police (Chapter 352, Acts of 1997). The office of State Fire Marshal was first created in 1894 to investigate suspicious fires throughout the State and prosecute guilty parties (Chapter 248, Acts of 1894). The office was funded by insurance revenues, and insurance companies were required to report all claims for fire losses to the Fire Marshal. The mere existence of the office was thought to deter arson. By 1915, the Fire Marshal was investigating annually over one thousand fires statewide and inspecting fire exits and escapes in public buildings. In 1916, the position of State Fire Marshal was abolished and its powers and duties transferred to the State Insurance Commissioner who was authorized to appoint an additional deputy to handle fire duties (Chapter 521, Acts of 1916). In 1964, the office of State Fire Marshal was recreated, along with the State Fire Prevention Commission, a new State Fire Prevention Code, and revision of laws pertaining to fires and investigations, fireworks, and explosives (Chapter 46, Acts of 1964).


Online Museum Pictures

And now we are preparing for our online Baltimore Police Museum where we're going to put pics of items here that could and will be on other places, on this site. We will have pics here... with a more complete story someplace on the site. We are always looking, unique shots of badges, patches, nightsticks, and other nice BPD pics. These pics will often be linked to other catagories on the site, like out Nightstick/Espantoon page, Patch page, Badge page, Auto, or Auto Accident (Departmental) page. We also want actual items on for the site and future museum site.

If you have photos of unique items that you would like added to this page, please send them to us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or mail them to us at 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222 care of Baltimore City Police History or Ret Det Kenny Driscoll

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Courtesy Bill Hackley
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Courtesy Bill Hackley
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Courtesy Bill Hackley
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Courtesy Bill Hackley
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Courtesy Bill Hackley
5georgeevansroundsergeant1898
Courtesy Bill Hackley
1857invoiceforguns4-27-1857
Courtesy Bill Hackley
1857invoicetopurchase200revolvers8-15-1857
Courtesy Brice Green


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Courtesy Bill Hackley
1880 leave slip
Courtesy Bill Hackley
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Courtesy Bill Hackley
1931 bpd baseball ticket
Courtesy Bill Hackley
1956recruitment-phamplet-2
Courtesy Bill Hackley
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Courtesy Bill Hackley
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Courtesy Bill Hackley
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Courtesy Bill Hackley
wagon18
Courtesy Bill Hackley
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Courtesy Bill Hackley
arrested 9-11-1898-1
arrested 9-11-1898-2
Courtesy Bill Hackley
arrested 1800s-1
arrested 1800s-2
Courtesy Bill Hackley
bertillion form front
Courtesy Bill Hackley
bertillion form back
Courtesy Bill Hackley
31 CAL COLT REVOLVER 1
Courtesy Bruce Green
bpd 10 codes
Courtesy Bill Hackley
bpd telephone boxes 1
Courtesy Bill Hackley
111
Courtesy Bill Hackley
bpd telephone boxes 2
Courtesy Bill Hackley
citation of appreciation
Courtesy Bill Hackley
city of baltimore 1800s2
Courtesy Bill Hackley
Extradition Order
Courtesy Bill Hackley
falsepretenses1906
Courtesy Bill Hackley
Baltimore Police Case Book 1963-1964
Courtesy Bill Hackley
frankdruschlercertificatedec.1900
Courtesy Bill Hackley
frankdruschlercertificatefeb.1900
Courtesy Bill Hackley
howtocallpolicesa7-1200.jpg.w300h522
Courtesy Bill Hackley
jacobgminderinvoice1870s
Courtesy Bill Hackley
lookout4-23-1937.jpg.w300h487
Courtesy Bill Hackley
look out 12-21-19331.jpg.w300h495
Courtesy Bill Hackley
Look out December8 1932
Courtesy Bill Hackley
map southern dist. 1850
Courtesy Bill Hackley
middle district april 1864
Courtesy Bill Hackley
mugshot 1 1914
mugshot 2 1914
Courtesy Bill Hackley
poster1906
Courtesy Bill Hackley
Police Taxi license 1950 front
Courtesy Bill Hackley
Taxi Drivers License issued and maintained by the Police DepartmentPolice Taxi license 1950 back
Courtesy Bill Hackley
Taxi Drivers License issued and maintained by the Police Department

recruitment1a
Courtesy Bill Hackley
report
Courtesy Bill Hackley
Riot orders1
Courtesy Bill Hackley
Riot orders2
Courtesy Bill Hackley
Riot orders3a
Courtesy Bill Hackley
sdnightwatchmanletter3-30-1852
Courtesy Bill Hackley
trafficsummons6-18-49.jpg.w300h404
Courtesy Bill Hackley
wanted homicide 3-18-1981
Courtesy Bill Hackley
wanted poster 1-14-1904
Courtesy Bill Hackley
wanted poster aug.20 1906
Courtesy Bill Hackley
wanted poster 14 feb 26 1909
Courtesy Bill Hackley
wanted poster bail forfeiture jan 18 1919
Courtesy Bill Hackley
wanted poster december 26 1911
Courtesy Bill Hackley
wanted poster dec 13 1911
Courtesy Bill Hackley
wanted poster fidelity deposit
Courtesy Bill Hackley
wanted poster march 19 1940
Courtesy Bill Hackley
wanted poster may16 1912
Courtesy Bill Hackley
wanted poster may 14 1908
Courtesy Bill Hackley
wanted poster nov 6 1911
Courtesy Bill Hackley
wanted poster nov 21 1911
Courtesy Bill Hackley
warrant for debt aug 28 1828
Courtesy Bill Hackley
warrant for debt aug 28 1828 1
Courtesy Bill Hackley
williamward1895
Courtesy Bill Hackley
williamward1897
Courtesy Bill Hackley
williamward18912
Courtesy Bill Hackley

black out sign
Courtesy Bill Hackley

wagon18
Courtesy Bill Hackley
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Courtesy Bill Hackley
100 1193
Courtesy Bill Hackley
bpdlantern
Courtesy Bill Hackley
111

Courtesy Bill Hackley
ESPOSAARG1
Courtesy Kenny Driscoll
1920's Chain Come-a-long

ESPOSAARG2
Courtesy Kenny Driscoll
1920's Chain Come-a-long

ESPOSAARG3
Courtesy Kenny Driscoll
1920's Chain Come-a-long

ironclaw
Courtesy Bill Hackley
Iron Claw

598662 3702148665101 1166973315 n
Courtesy Bill Hackley
Iron Claw / Come-a-Long

Leather
Courtesy Kenny Driscoll
Leather Come-a-Long

m10restraints
Courtesy Bill Hackley

rattle
Courtesy Bill Hackley

box1
Courtesy Bill Hackley

box2
Courtesy Bill Hackley

firstaidkit
Courtesy Bill Hackley

firstaid kit2
Courtesy Bill Hackley

museum2
Courtesy Bill Hackley

museum3
Courtesy Bill Hackley

museum4
Courtesy Bill Hackley

museum5
Courtesy Bill Hackley
m6docket
Courtesy Bill Hackley
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This sign
Courtesy Kenny Driscoll
was purchased of eBay for $255.00
It can be seen in the pic below

officer l merrifield

Courtesy Retired Officer Lawrence Merrifield

 Officer Lawrence Merrifield on "Jeff" if front of the old stables on Fredrick St. in 1969

The Above sign shows we are always looking for BPD items
m7k9

Courtesy Bill Hackley
m9mugshots
Courtesy Bill Hackley
onfootpatrollight.jpg.w300h225
Courtesy Bill Hackley
picture05
Courtesy Bill Hackley
uniform19
Courtesy Bill Hackley
wagon10
Courtesy Bill Hackley
wagon18
Courtesy Bill Hackley
wagon22
Courtesy Bill Hackley
wagon25
Courtesy Bill Hackley
wall13
Courtesy Bill Hackley
31 CAL COLT REVOLVER .2
Courtesy Bruce Green
31 CAL COLT REVOLVER .4
Courtesy Bruce Green
31 CAL COLT REVOLVER 1
Courtesy Bruce Green
31 CAL COLT REVOLVER 3
Courtesy Bruce Green
38 cal Colt revolver used by BPD 1940-1950s
Courtesy Bruce Green
1947nightstickarticle12-7-19471
Courtesy Bill Hackley
1947nightstickarticle12-7-19472

Courtesy Bill Hackley
1966 equipment BPD Officer
Courtesy Bill Hackley
BPD Revolver 1875 1
Courtesy Bruce Green
BPD Revolver 1875 2
Courtesy Bruce Green
BPD Revolver 1875 4
Courtesy Bruce Green
pistol2
Courtesy Bruce Green
pistol3
Courtesy Bruce Green
pistol4
Courtesy Bruce Green
pistol5
Courtesy Bruce Green
pistol6
Courtesy Bruce Green
pistol7a
Courtesy Bruce Green

Devider

Sgt. Lee Rodgers

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Photo Courtesy of Mark Rodgers
Sgt Lee Rodgers


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Photo Courtesy of Mark Rodgers


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Photo Courtesy of Mark Rodgers


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Photo Courtesy of Mark Rodgers

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Photo Courtesy of Mark Rodgers

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Photo Courtesy of Mark Rodgers


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Photo Courtesy of Mark Rodgers


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Photo Courtesy of Mark Rodgers


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Photo Courtesy of Mark Rodgers


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Photo Courtesy of Mark Rodgers


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Photo Courtesy of Mark Rodgers


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Photo Courtesy of Mark Rodgers


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Photo Courtesy of Mark Rodgers


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Photo Courtesy of Mark Rodgers


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Photo Courtesy of Mark Rodgers

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Photo Courtesy of Mark Rodgers


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Devider

Jim Bowen

KSCN0024 72
Photo Courtesy of Mark Rodgers
KSCN0054 72
Courtesy Jim Bowen
Sparky

KSCN0101 72
Courtesy Jim Bowen

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Courtesy Jim Bowen
KSCN0105 72
Courtesy Jim Bowen
KSCN0108 copy 3  72Courtesy Jim Bowen

KSCN0110 72Courtesy Jim Bowen
KSCN0111 72Courtesy Jim Bowen
KSCN0112 copy 2 72Courtesy Jim Bowen
with Sparky
KSCN0112 copy 72Courtesy Jim Bowen
with Sparky
KSCN0113 copy 2 72Courtesy Jim Bowen
Sparky
KSCN0113 copy 72 72 Courtesy Jim Bowen
Sparky
KSCN0114 copy 2 72Courtesy Jim Bowen
Sparky
KSCN0114 copy 3 72iCourtesy Jim Bowen
Sparky
KSCN0119  72iCourtesy Jim Bowen
Officer Sparky
KSCN0121 copy 18 72
Courtesy Jim Bowen
with Sparky
KSCN0121 copy 19 72
Courtesy Jim Bowen
with Sparky
KSCN0132 copy 2 72
Courtesy Jim Bowen
with Bear
KSCN0132 copy 72
Courtesy Jim Bowen
with Bear
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Courtesy Jim Bowen
with Bear
KSCN0005  72i
Courtesy Jim Bowen
KSCN0025 72i
Courtesy Jim Bowen
KSCN0032 72i
Courtesy Jim Bowen
KSCN0035 72i
Courtesy Jim Bowen
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Courtesy Jim Bowen
KSCN0033 72i
Courtesy Jim Bowen
KSCN0029 72i
Courtesy Jim Bowen

KSCN0034 72i
Courtesy Jim Bowen

KSCN0036 72i
Courtesy Jim Bowen
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Courtesy Jim Bowen

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Courtesy Jim Bowen
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Courtesy Jim Bowen

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Courtesy Jim Bowen

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Courtesy Jim Bowen

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Courtesy Jim Bowen
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Courtesy Jim Bowen

maryland_flag_line6.jpg

Capt. William J. Forrest

Sergeant William J Forrest
Sgt Wm. Forrest 1907 (The Father)

captain william forrestCaptain William J Forrest Son

Later Promoted to Inspector

inspector william forrest badge1
Original Inspector badge and case belonging to Inspector William J Forrest

inspector william forrest badge2The origional badge issued to Inspector William J Forrest
pistol6

 Courtesy Bruce Green

While we can see this isn't the same holster, or for the same make model gun, we can see it is made by the same leather smith, we can see that portion where the two straps come together and look like a seven almost, and that it is unique to both holsters - We can also see from information in the photo that this was custom made for a Smith & Wesson "Baby Russian"  a .38 Cal. Revolver often carried by our Police back in the late 1800's early 1900's - we should also note, that during these time a lot of officers carried their pistols in their pocket, hence the need of a pocket holster. We have had several serious injuries, even some deaths caused by this seriously unsafe method of carrying a weapon.

The Following are Holsters Formerly Owned by Inspector Forrest
The following two Holsters were purchased from a seller of antique firearms, leather and other police related
Antiquities. This seller was selling these for Charles "Charlie" Klein, Charlie is 84 years old as of the time of this post (April 2014) he said he got these from his Uncle William Forest, a one time Inspector.  

 57i

Pocket Holster from the Late 1800's early 1900's
 57ii
Pocket Holster from the Late 1800's early 1900's
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Pocket Holster from the Late 1800's early 1900's
 57iuy
Audley Saftey Holster Pat. 13 Oct. 1914
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Audley Saftey Holster Pat. 13 Oct. 1914

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Audley Saftey Holster Pat. 13 Oct. 1914
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On the right we see the rear of the Audley Safety Holster Pat. 13 Oct. 1914
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On the
Right we see the rear of the Audley Safety Holster Pat. 13 Oct. 1914

The Audley Safety Holster Company was established in the early 1900s, prior to 1905, by F. H. Audley who had previously been a Saddle, Harness and Boot maker. These were trades he had learned early in life as a young boy and developed over 30 in the Saddlery and Harness business.

Having started his own saddlery business in New York, at 2557 Third Avenue (Near 139th Street), in approximately 1876 and operating until 1885, F. H. Audley closed his business and went into business with Mr. P. H. Comerford remaining in Saddlery, Harness & Boot making. In 1891, Frank H. Audley went back into business himself and although making quality saddlery and boots, he struggled over the next 10 years until the turn of the century.

In the early 1900s, F. H. Audley moved his shop to 8 Centre Market Place, across from Police Headquarters and it was at this time he starting getting a lot of exposure to Police equipment. From this time, F. H. Audley filed many patents for various pieces of Police equipment which he developed and sold to many of the New York City Police Officers that utilized he services from his accessible location.

The most famous of these inventions was the Audley Safety Holster which F. H. Audley applied for patents in 1912 and they were approved October 13, 1914. The holster incorporates a spring loaded steel catch in the body of the holster which securely holds the pistol in place. It can only be released by using the index finger to depress the catch. It is virtually impossible for anyone other than the person wearing the holster to do this. No other retaining strap is required.

They were popular with many officers in WW1 and were also used by many American Police Departments. The Audley Company was taken over by the Folsom Arms Co., which in turn was absorbed by the Cortland Bootjack Co, and eventually became the JayPee holster company. This particular model was probably used by a motor cycle or horse mounted officer of the 1920-30 period.

Francis H. Audley Died in May of 1916 and by chance, I was able to find a copy of the Obituary from the New York Times May 11, 1916

More Can Be Found on Sgt and Inspector Forrest Here

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Detective Retired Leo Smith

BPD POLICE TRADING CARD UL
Courtesy of Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll
Mock Baltimore Police "Trading Card" made to honor myuncle (Ret Det Leo Smith
Det. Smith retired long before these cards were ever thought of.
1960 Dec ULCourtesy Mabel Smith
Class Photo Dec 1960

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Police Stand Guard Outside Black Panther Hall
Circled is Det Leo Smith

badge 1858 2
Courtesy  Mabel Smith
In 1976 they Issued new Badges
My Uncle Leo's Badge number was 1858

Retired Detective Leo Smith

Detective Leo Smith joined the Baltimore Police Department in Dec 1960. During his time in the Baltimore Police Department Officer Smith was first assigned to the Western District where he worked Tact. Section before going to K9 in 1962; (K9 was formed in 1956 by Commissioner James Hepbron, and became official in 1958, 4 years later while it was still being molded into the unit it is today).  While in the K9 unit Det Smith handled two dogs, 1st Rusty, a great dog, then Prince, a bit of a biter. Prince once bit either a doctor, or male nurse at the ER - and was rumored to have bitten an Officer at a Lumber Yard in the Central District. Before long Prince couldn't be counted on for the tasks of a Baltimore K9 dog, so he like so many others was flunked out of the Baltimore K9 program, and drafted into the Military where he would eventually serve in Vietnam.  He was said to have been an outstanding Military K9, a war hereo that risks hs life to save the life of an American Soldier. Det Smith was an above adverage police officer, an exceptional K9 handler, and an outstand Detective, assigned to fugative section in it's infancy, he had an eye for detail, and a way with those he had arrested that made them feel as though they owed him something, so when they got out, they would often contact him to give him information of others he was looking for. He told me when I joined that it is important to build a rapport, never breaking a promise, or making a promise you can't keep. If a person feel they can trust you, they will continue to bring you information even after their debt to you has been paid, to them it is not just putting a favor in the bank, but they really want a police as a freind, it makes them feel important, at the same time, you can't trust them. They are what they are, and really your freind. Det Leo Smith was a great story teller, with enough experience to tell some great first hand police, "WAR STORIES", I know first hand, he is my uncle; and to me he was both an amazing Police Officer/Detective and anOutstanding Uncle. During a camping trip 1974 when I was just ten years old, we were on a family camping trip, he was telling some of his war stories while we sat at a picnic table in our camp site D40 Shad Landing Statem Park in Snow Hill MAryland; (My Uncles Camp Site was D39, right next stor to ours). While we talked two trucks with camp rangers went to my uncles site, my aunt directed them over to our site. It was Thursday, August 1st, 1974; when the rangers saw me sitting there, they decided to call him away from me to talk, calling him to the end of the driveway they gave him some bad news, I could tell it was bad because it seemed that this group of as many as five or six adults were choked up, as if they wanted to cry, they were all emotional, but didn't shed a tear. After talking to the Rangers, my uncle quickly broke camp, and he and his family left for their trip back home. In a few days Det Leo Smith would be Paul Bearer for his Sergeant; Baltimore Police, Detective Sergeant, Frank W. Grunder, Jr... Serheant Grunder was killed in the line of duty on that 1st day of August, 1974 based on the following: Det. Sgt. Grunder, was the head of the Department’s new escape and apprehension unit, had spent several weeks attempting to track down the elusive members of a slippery hold up team. On 1 August, 1974, after a day of patrolling locations in the city in an attempt to find these dangerous hold-up men; Sgt. Grunder had not yeilded any positive results, the Sergeant went home empty handed. While off duty, Sergeant Grunder was driving on Harford Road in Hamilton with his wife, and their three children. As he approached Echodale Avenue, he saw a man sitting crouched down on the steps leading from the street to the play ground lot of St. Dominic’s Roman Catholic Church. Weeks of waiting and watching had finally paid off; this was one of the suspects. He parked his car a safe distance from the church, called for a uniformed officer as a back-up, and waited. Officer Joe L. Shaw of the Northeastern District wasn’t the assigned back-up unit, but readily stopped when Sergeant Grunder waved him down. The 12-year veteran explained the situation to the newly graduated rookie uniformed officer; as they approached the suspect who was still sitting on the steps. Sergeant Grunder, was a few feet ahead of Officer Shaw as he ordered the suspect to stand, and place his hands on the wall. At this point the suspect lurched to his feet, and began running up the steps. Sergeant Grunder gave chase and reached the top step, the suspect went from a full speed sprint to a dead stop as drew a gun from his waist, wheeled it in the Sergeant’s direction where he began firing on the Sergeant at point blank range. The Sergeant was able to fire three shots in return as he fell to the sidewalk; mortally wounded. Sergeant Grunder fell to the ground, Officer Shaw took over the gunfight, exchanginh rounds with the suspect. The suspect dropped, Detective Sergeant was transported to Union Memorial Hospital where he was pronounced dead upon arrival. The assailant, a resident of the area, was also pronounced dead. Investigation into the suspect’s past revealed a string of felony arrests dating back to 1960.
Funeral services were held for the 34 year old Detective Sergeant Frank Grunder on August 5th at St. Dominic’s Catholic Church. I was so impressed by my Uncle’s life that I wanted to follow in his foot-steps, I wasn't sure I was cut out for this kind of work, but was so impressed I had to try. On 17 June 1987 I joined the Baltimore Police Department, I was 23, with a wife, a son, and another son on the way, I helped a Baltimore County Officer who was nearly victim of an attack during a neighborhood dispute; after helping her, I identified two suspects that had done a, Hit and Run on my car as I was driving my wife and oldest son to get something to eat. The officers asked what I did for a living, but before I could answer, they added, “If it’s not law enforcement; you are in the wrong line of work!” So I had a long talk with my wife, reminding her of my Uncle Leo, and all he had done with the BPD… within a year I had been hired by both Baltimore County, and Baltimore City. I stayed with the city for 16 years before breaking my back in the Line of Duty… The following pictures will show you why I loved this uncle so much; and why I followed in his footsteps. While showing you these pics, I hope you will see the dedication of most of our Baltimore Police, but moreover the dedication of Retired Detective Leo Smith.

gallery 1 24 1457802
Courtesy Mabel Smith
August
5st, 1974 funeral of Detective Sergeant Frank W. Grunder, Jr

Det Leo Smith
Courtesy Mabel Smith
Ret. Det Leo Smith in undercover clothing
gallery 1 24 98765
Courtesy Mabel Smith
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Courtesy Mabel Smith

Police acting as Fill in's for a physical line up
UL
Courtesy Mabel Smith
Officer Leo Smith
C
UL inservice
Courtesy Mabel
Smith
1
978 Criminal Investigation Training Class
Retirment Leo Smith w Commish
Courtesy Mabel
Smith
Retirem
ent with Commissioner Bishop Robinson
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Courtesy Mabel Smith
Retirem
ent with Commissioner Bishop Robinson
 

Leo Smith Ret ii
Courtesy Mabel
Smith
Retir
ement 
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Courtesy Mabel Smith
Retir
ement 

ul
Courtesy Mabel Smith
Retir
ement 

ul3

 Courtesy Mabel Smith

 Governor's Citation

 

More Can Be Found on Sgt and Inspector Forrest Here

Devider color with motto

Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department.

Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

  Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll

Comments   

#1 patty 2015-05-16 09:13
If you have pictures, Comments, Suggestions etc. please send them to me at the email address above, as you can see Ken and I have put much of our time and money into this project, so we don't mind errors pointed out to us, just as Ken's partner used to say, "Keep it Friendly!" send Ken or me and email.. thanks - Patty
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Baltimore City Police History
  The Baltimore FloodIn 1868, The Jones Falls OverflowedCausing a Disaster Known as "Baltimore’s Black Friday Flood.” In 1868, the Jones Falls overflowed, a disaster now known as Baltimore’s “Black Friday Flood.” The flood, which is illustrated above on the cover of Frank Leslie’s Illustrated, took 50 lives and caused millions of dollars in ...
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Baltimore City Police History
HISTORY of FOP LODGE #3 These are Old Brass Printers Plates for FOP Letterheads and Envelopes FOP Stamps Some background History on the FOP Logo The five-cornered star reminds us of the allegiance we owe to our Flag it is a symbol of the authority with which we are entrusted. It is an honor the people we serve bestow upon us. They place their confidence and trust in us to do the right thing, ...
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Baltimore City Police History
    Our PoliceRemembering Our Heroes  MOTTO OF THE DEPARTMENT  "EVER ON THE WATCH" CITATION OF VALORSworn members who have sustained gunshot wounds, stab wounds, or serious injury under aggravated and hostile circumstances which could result in death or permanent disability while acting in their official capacity are eligible for this ...
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Baltimore City Police History
  Baltimore City Police   Wagons in a Pinch Sun Paper Jun 29th 1949 BY FIRST HAND TESTIMONIAL, Baltimore‚Äôs new police wagons are vehicles in which their passengers are proud to ride. They are roomier, more fordable, faster, of smarter design and, in dozens of other ways, a world of improvement over the department's former free transportation fleet. The enthusiasm of the ...
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Baltimore City Police History
  Police History It is no secret that America inherited much of its governmental institutions from Great Britain. American law enforcement is no exception. British policing can be traced back to before the Norman Conquest of England in 1066. The first Europeans who landed on our shores, found a strange and wondrous new land, inhabited by strange and wondrous people. The newcomers had ...
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Baltimore City Police History
    The Maryland Seal and the Baltimore Arms For The SunCOSMOS The Sun (1837-1987); Nov 1, 1880; pg. 6 The Maryland Seal and the Baltimore Arms In the Library of the City Hall you will find two electric types, one of which is called “The Seal of the State of Maryland” the other “The Coat of Arms of Lord Baltimore” and the ...
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Baltimore City Police History
Women and the Baltimore Police Department Timeline of some of Baltimore's Women in Law Enforcement In the 1915 BPD Rules and Regulations, a Policewomen's job was described as Rule 20 Page 48-49 Matrons of the Police Force (Policewomen) 1. Matrons of the Police Force (Policewomen), are conservators of the peace and members of the Force; they are amenable to the rules and regulations of ...
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Copies of: Your Baltimore Police Department Class Photo, Pictures of our Officers, Vehicles, Equipment, Newspaper Articles relating to our department and or officers, Old Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, and or Brochures. Information on Retired or Deceased Officers and anything that may help us to Preserve the History and Proud Traditions of this agency.
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